European Super League: ESL chairman says, ‘current Champions league revenue model unfair, clubs will die’

European Super League: ESL chairman Florentino Pérez says, ‘current Champions league revenue model unfair, clubs will die'
European Super League: ESL chairman Florentino Pérez says, ‘current Champions league revenue model unfair, clubs will die'

European Super League – ESL Chairman reveals why the new league has been former? European Super League chairman Florentino Pérez has claimed that they are starting ESL to save football clubs from dying. According to Perez current revenue sharing models by UEFA is very unfair and that’s the reason this new league has been formed. Perez who is also the president of Spanish La-Liga football club Real Madrid and founding chairman of the highly controversial European Super League, has said the proposed breakaway competition is a necessity as “all clubs will die” under the Uefa Champions League revenue model.

Also Read: European Super League Football: All you want to know about European…

“We have to explain to everybody that this is not a league for the rich clubs,” Pérez told Spanish television programme El Chiringuito de Jugones“It’s a league to save all the clubs. Otherwise, football will die.”

On Sunday, 12 of Europe’s biggest clubs released a statement that they will be part of the newly proposed league. England’s Arsenal, Chelsea, Liverpool, Manchester City, Manchester United and Tottenham Hotspur had joined Italy’s AC Milan, Inter Milan and Juventus, plus Spain’s Atlético Madrid, Barcelona and Real Madrid as the founding members of the competition. 

European Super League – Will it take off without agreement with UEFA? 

Pérez admitted that the new league is unlikely to start next season if no agreement is ultimately reached with European football’s governing body, Uefa. He added that extra impetus has been added to the ESL project by football’s financial struggles during Covid-19.

“We are all going through a very difficult situation,” Pérez said.

“When you don’t have revenue, the only way to change that is to attempt to have more competitive games, more attractive games. Football has to evolve, just like businesses have to evolve and everyone has to evolve. Football needs to adapt. We felt that we needed to change something to help make football more attractive.”

He continued: “With the way revenues are now in the Champions League, all clubs will die. The big ones, medium ones and small ones. By 2024, when this new format is supposed to start, the clubs will all be gone.”

Reasons given by Perez why ESL is necessity?

– Pérez also maintained the revenues generated by the ESL will provide benefits across the wider football ecosystem, adding that the “money will end up reaching everyone.”

– ESL project is thought to be driven in part by a desire by the clubs to take control of the media rights and sell directly to fans through in-house streaming channels.

– The Champions League is attractive from the quarterfinals according to Perez. We play against small clubs that aren’t attractive. Young people prefer to entertain themselves with other things. But if we play all season, five games on Tuesday, five on Wednesday, that would be unstoppable.

– The 15 clubs playing each other every week would bring in money. That’s the greatest show in the world, there’s nothing like it. A Real Madrid-Manchester (United) or a Barcelona-Milan game is more attractive than Manchester (United) against a small club.

– “What does the world demand? We have fans in Singapore, in China, across the world, you see that on social media, the followers we have. That’s what brings in money.”

– Meanwhile, the ESL masterplan claims it will provide “a sustainable and competitive environment” for the whole football pyramid by offering more than three times the level of solidarity payments to smaller clubs than currently exists.

– According to the ESL plans, solidarity payments would be in excess of $10bn (€8.3bn) and would be paid out over 23 years.

All you want to know about European Super League start date, List of confirmed teams & clubs, FIFA & UEFA sanctions

European Super League Football – Who are the 12 ‘founding members’?

Milan, Arsenal, Atlético Madrid, Chelsea, Barcelona, Inter, Juventus, Liverpool, Manchester City, Manchester United, Real Madrid and Tottenham.

European Super League Football – What about the big German and French clubs?

German & French Clubs are yet to join the break-away Super-League. Be it last year’s Champions League & Bundesliga winner Bayern Munich or French champions Paris Saint Germain, none of them have joined the breakaway league as yet   They have said that they are currently not interesting in joining the project. PSG is currently in the semi-finals of Champions League and will play Manchester City. 

European Super League Football – Will the 12 clubs leave their domestic leagues?

At the moment they are hoping to remain playing in those competitions but the leagues have all issued strong-worded statements condemning the clubs and the new breakaway league.

European Super League Football – How much money is involved, who is funding the SUPER-LEAGUE? 

The monies projected in the European Super League is phenomenal, much more than what clubs currently make by playing Champions League or any other competition. The statement from the 12 clubs said: “Founding clubs will receive an amount of €3.5bn solely to support their infrastructure investment plans and to offset the impact of the Covid pandemic.” It added: “The new annual tournament will provide significantly greater economic growth and support for European football … and [solidarity payments] are expected to be in excess of €10bn during the course of the initial commitment period of the clubs.”

European Super League Football – How would it work, what is the format of the competition?

There would be 20 participating clubs, with 15 founding clubs and a qualifying mechanism for a further five teams to qualify annually based on achievements in the prior season.

European Super League Football – Start Dates, schedules and when would matches be played?

There would be midweek fixtures with all participating clubs hoping to compete in their respective national leagues. There would be two groups of 10, playing home and away fixtures, with the top three in each group automatically qualifying for the quarter-finals. Teams finishing fourth and fifth would then compete in a two-legged play-off for the remaining quarter-final positions. A two-leg knockout format would be used to reach the final at the end of May, which would be staged as a single fixture at a neutral venue.

The clubs said in their statement that they were looking to start the competition in August.

European Super League Football: What did the organisers claim?

Florentino Pérez, president of Real Madrid and the first chairman of the Super League, said: “We will help football at every level and take it to its rightful place in the world. Football is the only global sport in the world with more than four billion fans and our responsibility as big clubs is to respond to their desires.” 

Perez’s vice-chairs will be Joel Glazer of Manchester United and Andrea Agnelli of Juventus. 

Glazer said: “By bringing together the world’s greatest clubs and players to play each other throughout the season, the Super League will open a new chapter for European football, ensuring world-class competition and facilities, and increased financial support for the wider football pyramid.”

European Super League Football – How FIFA, UEFA & Others are reacting to the development? 

There has been widespread criticism at the idea. 

European football’s governing body UEFA have expressed their disapproval, claiming players participating in the Super League could be “banned from all UEFA and FIFA competitions, European or International level.”

FIFA also condemned the proposals. “FIFA can only express its disapproval to a “closed European breakaway league” outside of the international football structures and not respecting the aforementioned principles,” it said in a statement.

“FIFA always stands for unity in world football and calls on all parties involved in heated discussions to engage in calm, constructive and balanced dialogue for the good of the game and in the spirit of solidarity and fair play.

Gary Neville, the former Manchester United defender summing up most people’s feelings when he said: 

‘I’m disgusted with Manchester United and Liverpool the most. They’re breaking away to a competition they can’t be relegated from? It’s an absolute disgrace. It’s pure greed, they’re impostors. The owners of Man United, Liverpool, Chelsea and Man City have nothing to do with football in this country. They’re an absolute joke. Time has come now to have independent regulators to stop these clubs from having the power base. Enough is enough’