UEFA Champions League Final: Pep Guardiola reveals ideal formation to beat Chelsea; Check

UEFA Champions League Final: It is a term that once puzzled pundits and upset traditionalists but City manager Pep says the 'false nine'
UEFA Champions League Final: It is a term that once puzzled pundits and upset traditionalists but City manager Pep says the 'false nine'

UEFA Champions League Final: It is a term that once puzzled pundits and upset traditionalists but Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola says the ‘false nine’ brings out the best in his team, and it would be no surprise to see it used in Saturday’s Champions League final against Chelsea.

The unconventional tactic involves playing without a traditional centre-forward, or ‘number nine’, leading the attacking line but with either an advanced midfielder or a withdrawn striker in a deeper position. The absence of the ‘nine’ gives no obvious player for central defenders to mark and encourages them to move out of the back-line to pick up the deeper player, thereby leaving space behind them that can be exploited.

It also creates a cluster of players in the pockets of space in front of the defence.
The approach has been so successful for City this season that Guardiola has used it in all but one of the knockout stage matches of this season’s Champions League campaign — meaning no place for centre-forwards Gabriel Jesus and Sergio Aguero.

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In an interview with BT Sport, conducted by former Manchester United and England defender Rio Ferdinand, Guardiola explained the reasoning behind the tactic.

Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City are 90 minutes away from the trophy they so desperately crave but a Chelsea side transformed in recent months stand in their way in Saturday’s all-English Champions League final in Porto, the Portuguese city which was named as a last-minute host.

“It is have the central defenders, whoever plays, go 10 metres to pick him up. A little bit for this fact (also) to pass the ball, you have to have people closer,” he said.
“I always think when the passes are from distance, 15-20 metres, it is so easy for defenders, holding midfielders, when the pass is from two to three metres, it is more difficult,” he said.

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Guardiola’s teams are famed for their possession football based around close passing. From his days at Barcelona, where he won two Champions League titles, to his Bundesliga-winning Bayern Munich side, and to City, who have won three of the last four Premier League titles.

The Spaniard says such an approach is part of his DNA. “I love to pass the ball, I love to take the ball, pass the ball, I love it,” he said. “I don’t know, I was born in this culture and I like it. To do this, you have to put a lot of players (close to each other).”