Women’s Cricket World Cup prize money doubled to $2m


 

Women’s Cricket World Cup prize money has been doubled to US$ 2 million (Rs 1.29 crore). The International Cricket Council has announced the unprecedented increase in funding and coverage for the Women’s World Cup 2017. The coveted event to be hosted by England and Wales from June 24 to July 23, 2017. Defending champion Australia, England, India, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka and the West Indies will be in fray

In yet another unprecedented development all the World Cup games will be broadcast live. These announcements are part of the ICC Board’s unanimous decision for global development of women’s cricket, committing to parity across men and women’s cricket in next 15 years. The ICC will launch a blueprint for the growth and sustainability of the sport.

ICC Chief Executive David Richardson said the changes brought cricket up to speed with global changes in appreciation for women’s sport. “We think the Women’s World Cup this summer will be a turning point in the history of the game. There is growing interest globally in women’s sports and we want cricket to be front and centre of this and lead by example,” he added.

The increased coverage of the women’s game is also good news for retired female players and commentators. The coverage team for 2017 includes former England captain and Women’s World Cup winner Charlotte Edwards, former India captain Anjum Chopra and World Cup winners in Australians Lisa Sthalekar and Melanie Jones.

The set of announcements comes as part of the ICC Board’s unanimous decision to accelerate the global development of women’s cricket, committing to parity across men and women’s cricket within 15 years. In line with this promise, the ICC will later this year launch a blueprint for the growth and sustainability of the sport.

ICC Chief Executive David Richardson said the changes brought cricket up to speed with global changes in appreciation for women’s sport. “We think the Women’s World Cup this summer will be a turning point in the history of the game. There is growing interest globally in women’s sports and we want cricket to be front and centre of this and lead by example.

The increased coverage of the women’s game is also good news for retired female players and commentators. The coverage team for 2017 includes former England captain and Women’s World Cup winner Charlotte Edwards, former India captain Anjum Chopra and World Cup winners in Australians Lisa Sthalekar and Melanie Jones.


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